Wednesday, September 22, 2010

JFK Neurotoxin Conspiracy Theory Published in Medical Hypotheses

With fabulous hand drawn color figures!


Fig. 1 (Salerian, 2010). Drawing.

Summary

“President John F. Kennedy’s death was a neurotoxin-assisted homicide” is the hypothesis of this study.

A review of medical evidence demonstrates evidence of a neurotoxin-assisted homicide. The convergence of three independent actions, or the signature traits of a neurotoxin-assisted homicide- the emergence of neurological signs consistent with a neurotoxin-induced paralysis, the induction of a small neck wound consistent with a flechette-transported neurotoxin entry wound, and the execution of a coverup to eliminate neurotoxin evidence, supports this hypothesis.

This review suggests, JFK’s death had all the signature traits of a neurotoxin-assisted homicide.

The paper was covered by NCBI ROFL two months ago but I missed it at the time. The author is psychiatrist Dr. Alen J. Salerian of the International Center for Evidence Based History, a site that exists primarily to promote and sell his JFK artwork.

Dr. Salerian also holds some rather colorful views of neurotransmitters, or Viagra for Your Brain...
GABA (GABA-GAMMA-AMNIOBUTYRIC ACID)
GABA is an elegant force of your calm and inner peace. For example, a brain with sickly GABA has recurrent seizures and is almost always irritable, edgy, and combative. In less traumatic cases, sickly GABA may make you fearful, easily reactive, and may cause insomnia.

DOPAMINE
Dopamine gives you energy, concentration, alertness, initiative, and perhaps most importantly the ability to enjoy life. When your dopamine is out of sorts, so is your joy.

NOREPINEPHRINE
Norepinephrine is a good friend of dopamine and offers you energy, alertness, and concentration.
...plus this hefty dose of 5-HT misinformation:
SEROTONIN
So what do you say to a woman who is irritable, easily frustrated, and highly moody for a week before her menstrual cycle? Your serotonin is low! {NOTE: Oh no you don't...!}

Back to our conspiracy theory (Salerian, 2010):
The evidence of a death from a flechette-transported neurotoxin injury has seven components and is summarized in Table 1.

Table 1. Evidence of flechette-transported neurotoxin injury.

IA small entry wound
IIAn instant long startled response
IIISeveral minutes long no fight or flight response
IVSeveral minutes long vocal paralysis
VSeveral minutes long muscle paralysis
VIEvidence of neurotoxin-contaminated tissue
VIIThe availability of a weapon armed with a flechette-transported neurotoxin

A poison arrow – (a flechette-transported neurotoxin) blocks voltage-gated sodium channels through the nervous system and causes conduction failure and death due to suffocation. Broadly speaking, there are two major phases with characteristic symptoms. The initial symptoms are those due to the deleterious consequences of a flechette-induced injury, i.e., a small laceration of less than 1 cm in diameter and 1 cm in depth.

The second phase consists of symptoms associated with a neurotoxin’s effect with total vocal and motor paralysis.

. . . [etc.]

OK..... Then what?

The suspense is killing me.....

Fig. 5 (Salerian, 2010). Flechette-transported neurotoxin with Popup Fins.


The paper concludes like all good conspiracy theories:
Further studies are necessary to validate this conclusion. Of importance is the necessity for the US government to fully disclose the facts about the President’s death.

Reference


Salerian AJ. (2010). President Kennedy's death: a poison arrow-assisted homicide. Med Hypotheses 75:372-7.

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5 Comments:

At September 26, 2010 7:50 AM, Blogger Neuroskeptic said...

Salerian's previous publications include: 5 other papers in Medical Hypotheses, and "Successful treatment of sexual dysfunction with dronabinol [aka THC aka pot]: a case report." which sounds like fun.

 
At November 07, 2010 1:51 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

wow you are so smart... just copy and paste his entire published article and say it's a conspiracy theory because why? oh that's right you have no legitimate research to back up your hypothesis let alone your "opinion" that this is a "conspiracy theory". Bet you spent hours trying to figure out how to save those images and copy and paste. Must be hard work. Did you even write one original word in your post? I guess you love being ignorant just like every other person who comments on his "crazy" hypothesis without having any substantial evidence to prove otherwise. just, so, shabby.

Love,

a much more educated person

ps. I'm well aware this won't be published on your blog. too bad, since no one reads it anyway. shucks, right?

 
At November 07, 2010 3:40 AM, Blogger The Neurocritic said...

There you go, salarian, vainly doing a Google search for yourself in the middle of the night, from your home in Silver Spring, MD.

c-69-140-154-123.hsd1.md.comcast.net

It was really easy to copy and paste your laughable drawings into a post on my blog, which is more widely read than anything you've ever written.

Love,

a much more intelligent and sane person

 
At November 07, 2010 11:14 AM, Blogger The Neurocritic said...

This court opinion finding Dr. Alen J. Salerian guilty of a professional ethics violation is informative:

REPORTED IN THE COURT OF SPECIAL APPEALS OF MARYLAND No.624 [PDF]

To spare you the 35 page legal document, here's a news article:

Md. Court of Special Appeals upholds spy consultant setback

The Maryland State Board of Physicians rightly disciplined a psychiatrist who evaluated accused spy Robert P. Hanssen, then revealed Hanssen's disclosures to the media and Hanssen's wife, the Court of Special Appeals held.

The board found Alen J. Salerian guilty of "immoral or unprofessional conduct in the practice of medicine" and punished him with probation and a $5,000 fine. Salerian challenged the decision on multiple grounds, all of which the appellate court rejected on Wednesday.


In 2001, Salerian contacted Hanssen's attorney, Plato Cacheris, with an offer to perform a psychiatric evaluation of his client. Salerian was eventually hired on a limited basis, with the obvious stipulation that he should not approach the media or otherwise disclose confidential information.

During the interviews, Hanssen disclosed personal information about his unsavory sexual activities (including secret videotaping and other gross stuff) kept hidden from his wife:

On May 11, 2001, appellant disclosed to Cacheris what Evaluee had told him about his “sexual exploitation” of his wife. Cacheris instructed appellant not to reveal this information to anyone, including Evaluee’s wife. Yet, one day later, appellant disclosed Evaluee’s sexual activities to Evaluee’s wife. He did so, appellant explained in a letter to Cacheris, to “engender enhanced understanding and reconcilment [sic] between [Evaluee] and his wife . . . .”

But the prohibited disclosure went beyond the perhaps understandable desire to inform the wife of grave offenses committed against her. Salerian then contacted the media, thereby invalidating any noble intentions one might have attributed to him:

On June 12, 2001, Cacheris wrote to appellant, informing him that a producer for “Sixty Minutes” told Cacheris that appellant “had discussions with him concerning confidential matters involving [Evaluee].” Cacheris again warned appellant that appellant was “not permitted to disclose to anybody communications [he] may have had with [Evaluee] and members of his family” and that “any such disclosures will be violative of the attorney/client privilege and [appellant’s] own canons of medical ethics prohibiting disclosures,” and, furthermore, he reminded appellant that appellant signed the United States government’s “Special Administrative Measures,” which “prohibit public disclosures.”

[Two quotations above taken from the court document. Here's the transcript from a CBS interview: Reveals Impressions Of Accused Spy Hanssen]

Let's conclude with a link to a Dr. Drew-like ethical violation: offering vacuous "expert" psychiatric opinion on a celebrity:

'Is Kobe Bryant Guilty?' -- Commentary by Psychiatrist Alen J. Salerian

The comments are quite amusing...

 
At November 19, 2010 2:44 PM, Blogger Neuroskeptic said...

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.

That's what's called getting owned.

 

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